Another terrific introduction to bash scripts

Tania Rascia published a great introduction to bash scripting titled “How to Create and Use Bash Scripts“.

I especially like her git deploy script. I’ve been thinking about writing something along these lines for a little while now.

Tania creates a lot of really useful stuff, and this is just her latest contribution. If you’re interested in shell scripting, it’s well worth checking out.

My first Field Notes notebooks

Reading about how big a fan of Field Notes notebooks Jamie Rubin is, got me thinking about trying these versatile paper capture devices out. I eventually ordered a pair of Pitch Black Dot-Graph notebooks in late April, to be delivered to me by post.

I picked them up from the post office this morning, and I really like them!

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I love the inner covers!

Even though I prefer digital over paper, I still like taking some notes with pen and paper. It helps keep me focused on what I’m doing, largely because there aren’t any notifications, pop-ups, and other windows to switch to when you’re writing in a paper notebook.

What I typically do after I’ve taken my notes is scan them into Evernote (usually with the Evernote app). That way I have the best of both worlds: paper and pen for more focused notetaking, and a searchable digital record afterwards.

I chose dot-graph paper because it seems like a great compromise between lined and graph paper. I don’t usually take notes in a linear fashion. I like drawing, adding annotations, and so on. Dot-graph paper seems like a good fit for that. Just enough visual structure for my notes.

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The HumanWrites Writable

Another notebook that I’m interested in is the HumanWrites Writable, although I haven’t bought one yet. I love the dot-graph paper, and the HumanWrites mission to help further children’s education.

For the time being, though, I’m looking forward to using my Field Notes notebooks, hopefully in really productive, and creative ways.

We’re already living in the future

We’re living in an incredible time. Technologies that seemed like science fiction just a few years ago are being released, and they look incredible. Take the Microsoft Surface Hub 2 as an example:

Then, when you’ve watched that, take a trip back about six or seven years when these sorts of displays were fantastic dreams:

A day with smart glass envisioned by Corning

Yes, your window is your smart display

Even Google’s Jamboard already seems quaint, just two years after it was announced:

Jamboard and Surface Studio are hints of our future tech

We haven’t quite realised the dream of the sorts of ubiquitous screens and panels that we see in the Corning and Microsoft future vision videos, but given what we see now in Microsoft’s Surface Hub 2, we can’t be that far from these interfaces either.

New Adobe Color Profiles for Lightroom

I just watched this video about Adobe’s updated colour profiles, and it’s a really interesting update for Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop users!

I’m editing some photos from a morning jaunt with our kids and our new puppy in the park, and I like the new options. I hadn’t thought about colour profiles before, and now that I’ve experimented with them, I enjoy using them.

Here’s an introduction from Adobe:

Oh Firefox, You Little Resource Hog

I love using Firefox as my primary browser. I prefer using it for a variety of reasons. Lately, though, I’ve noticed that it’s become a bit of a resource hog, and I can’t work out why? I’ve disabled add-ons that I don’t need, and it still uses about 1.4GB of RAM at a minimum for pages that Chrome uses a quarter of RAM for.

Has something changed in Firefox’s architecture? One thought I had is that maybe this has to do with something like page pre-fetching (I think Firefox does that), or something along those lines. I want to sort this out. Chrome seems to be so much better at resource management at the moment.

Update (2018-03-18): Mozilla shared this page to help troubleshoot Firefox memory issues: Firefox uses too much memory (RAM) – How to fix | Firefox Help

Photo by ideadad on Unsplash

Getting Stuff Done with Interstitial Journaling

Coach Tony’s post titled Replace Your To-Do List With Interstitial Journaling To Increase Productivity is a pretty interesting take on productivity.

During your day, journal every time you transition from one work project to another. Write a few sentences in your journal about what you just did, and then a few more sentences about what you’re about to do.

Rather than just working through a list of tasks in your task manager, the idea seems to be to maintain an ongoing narrative of your day. A benefit of this approach is a pretty high degree of mindfulness.

Journaling as you work produces mindfulness about your context, goals, mood, and skills.

Another aspect of this approach that appeals to me is how it incorporates elements of the GTD approach to getting your stuff done. One of those elements is clearing your mind by getting whatever is occupying it out of your mind and onto paper (digital or physical).

The Interstitial Journaling tactic solves all of these normal problems. It kills procrastination, empties our brain of the last project, and then gives us space to formulate an optimal strategy for our next project.

When you write about the task you’ve just completed, and then about the upcoming task, you’re transitioning more fully from the completed task to the next task. At least, that seems to be the idea.

I also just like the idea of maintaining a pretty deliberate account of my days. This feels like something worth attempting, at the very least.

I’ve started incorporating Evernote into my Remember the Milk workflow through a handy integration, so Evernote seems like a convenient choice for the journaling too. I’ll try it out this week and see how it goes.

Photo by Estée Janssens on Unsplash

Awesome batch print trick for macOS

I came across an old, yet awesome, batch print trick for macOS yesterday. I had a series of PDFs that I needed to print and didn’t want to have to open each file to do it. I read about it in a post by Jesse Chapman titled “How to batch print multiple files in Mac OS X without opening them“.

The other day I wanted to print 25 PDFs without having to open each one and go to File > Print. Sounds simple enough. Turns out, it’s so simple that I couldn’t figure it out for quite a while.

There’s probably a command line way to do this, and I’d love to find that too. For now, this is pretty cool!

Image by Geraldine Lewa

Making sense of JavaScript array methods with Array Explorer

Sarah Drasner shared her awesome Array Explorer tool on Twitter the other day. It’s design is pretty simple, and yet a powerful way to learn JavaScript arrays. What you do is pick a couple options from drop-down lists to find the right array method you need for a project.

I still find arrays challenging and yet learning how to work with them in JavaScript is so important. If you’re still figuring this stuff out, definitely take a look at Array Explorer, bookmark it, and use it.

Sarah even made the code for Array Explorer available on GitHub so you can see how she put it together too.