“Telkom doesn’t have customers … it has hostages”

This video posted on Zoopy adds to the many voices speak out against Telkom. The video makes a good point: our apathy only benefits Telkom.

The problem, of course, is that until Neotel launches consumer services, there is no real alternative to Telkom. Sure there are mobile devices and mobile data is cheaper than before but even then it is still more expensive than a Telkom ADSL line. We are therefore hostages …

Of course we are all assuming that Neotel will offer some real products and services to tempt us away from Telkom. Let’s hope they don’t sink into the mediocrity mindset and offer marginally more than their competitor and actually exceed our expectations (which are pretty low, I think).

(Source: Zoopy blog)


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Paul
Enthusiast, marketing strategist, writer, and photographer. Passionate about my wife, Gina and #proudDad. Allergic to stupid

  1. Clever video πŸ™‚

    However, it would certainly help if ALL of us applied some higher business ethics: how many times do I have to call a supplier before he phones back? Or the account department of my clients that transferred the money, uh,….

    So, we all keep Telkom busy, making them richer only because of our own sloppy attitudes. Not clever.

    And just to rub it in: Telkom owns 50% of Vodacom.

    Perhaps VOIP is the way to go.

  2. Clever video πŸ™‚

    However, it would certainly help if ALL of us applied some higher business ethics: how many times do I have to call a supplier before he phones back? Or the account department of my clients that transferred the money, uh,….

    So, we all keep Telkom busy, making them richer only because of our own sloppy attitudes. Not clever.

    And just to rub it in: Telkom owns 50% of Vodacom.

    Perhaps VOIP is the way to go.

  3. Clever video πŸ™‚

    However, it would certainly help if ALL of us applied some higher business ethics: how many times do I have to call a supplier before he phones back? Or the account department of my clients that transferred the money, uh,….

    So, we all keep Telkom busy, making them richer only because of our own sloppy attitudes. Not clever.

    And just to rub it in: Telkom owns 50% of Vodacom.

    Perhaps VOIP is the way to go.

  4. Clever video πŸ™‚

    However, it would certainly help if ALL of us applied some higher business ethics: how many times do I have to call a supplier before he phones back? Or the account department of my clients that transferred the money, uh,….

    So, we all keep Telkom busy, making them richer only because of our own sloppy attitudes. Not clever.

    And just to rub it in: Telkom owns 50% of Vodacom.

    Perhaps VOIP is the way to go.

  5. VOIP is an alternative but when it comes to reliability and stability, Telkom is still tops, unfortunately. The mobile networks have fast connections but they are not pervasive or all that reliable. There are not enough wifi hotspots to make VOIP using wifi enabled devices the standard and we are probably years away from any sort of Wimax implementation. The first time we will likely see real alternatives is when Neotel launches.

  6. VOIP is an alternative but when it comes to reliability and stability, Telkom is still tops, unfortunately. The mobile networks have fast connections but they are not pervasive or all that reliable. There are not enough wifi hotspots to make VOIP using wifi enabled devices the standard and we are probably years away from any sort of Wimax implementation. The first time we will likely see real alternatives is when Neotel launches.

  7. VOIP is an alternative but when it comes to reliability and stability, Telkom is still tops, unfortunately. The mobile networks have fast connections but they are not pervasive or all that reliable. There are not enough wifi hotspots to make VOIP using wifi enabled devices the standard and we are probably years away from any sort of Wimax implementation. The first time we will likely see real alternatives is when Neotel launches.

  8. VOIP is an alternative but when it comes to reliability and stability, Telkom is still tops, unfortunately. The mobile networks have fast connections but they are not pervasive or all that reliable. There are not enough wifi hotspots to make VOIP using wifi enabled devices the standard and we are probably years away from any sort of Wimax implementation. The first time we will likely see real alternatives is when Neotel launches.

  9. VOIP relies on Telkom infrastructure anyway – it owns the cables…

    Will be interesting to see what Neotel is going to offer then – they have close, very close ties to the current entities – with Eskom & Transnet being shareholders.

    Will they have the courage, endurance and finances to stand up to Telkom-dominated government bodies, with all political implications? Will they be allowed to expand or will there be some covert policy to discourage and stall progress?

    Might result in some ‘leash-competitor’: they are allowed to compete, but for everything they have to battle and settle with Telkom and government bodies, effectively reducing real change and innovation.

    Patience and limited expectations will be my approach. Unfortunately.

  10. VOIP relies on Telkom infrastructure anyway – it owns the cables…

    Will be interesting to see what Neotel is going to offer then – they have close, very close ties to the current entities – with Eskom & Transnet being shareholders.

    Will they have the courage, endurance and finances to stand up to Telkom-dominated government bodies, with all political implications? Will they be allowed to expand or will there be some covert policy to discourage and stall progress?

    Might result in some ‘leash-competitor’: they are allowed to compete, but for everything they have to battle and settle with Telkom and government bodies, effectively reducing real change and innovation.

    Patience and limited expectations will be my approach. Unfortunately.

  11. VOIP relies on Telkom infrastructure anyway – it owns the cables…

    Will be interesting to see what Neotel is going to offer then – they have close, very close ties to the current entities – with Eskom & Transnet being shareholders.

    Will they have the courage, endurance and finances to stand up to Telkom-dominated government bodies, with all political implications? Will they be allowed to expand or will there be some covert policy to discourage and stall progress?

    Might result in some ‘leash-competitor’: they are allowed to compete, but for everything they have to battle and settle with Telkom and government bodies, effectively reducing real change and innovation.

    Patience and limited expectations will be my approach. Unfortunately.

  12. VOIP relies on Telkom infrastructure anyway – it owns the cables…

    Will be interesting to see what Neotel is going to offer then – they have close, very close ties to the current entities – with Eskom & Transnet being shareholders.

    Will they have the courage, endurance and finances to stand up to Telkom-dominated government bodies, with all political implications? Will they be allowed to expand or will there be some covert policy to discourage and stall progress?

    Might result in some 'leash-competitor': they are allowed to compete, but for everything they have to battle and settle with Telkom and government bodies, effectively reducing real change and innovation.

    Patience and limited expectations will be my approach. Unfortunately.

What do you think?

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