My favourite science shows

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

When I sit down to have lunch with our kids, I typically watch my favourite science shows on YouTube. I have three (give or take): PBS Eons;SciShow (along with SciShow Space); andIt’s Okay To Be Smart. I’m pretty sure our kids enjoy the shows, I certainly do. I also realised that there’s some overlap between…… Continue reading My favourite science shows

The greatest propaganda machine in history

Photo by Miguel Henriques on Unsplash

Sacha Baron Cohen recently spoke about how social media services have become the “greatest propaganda machine in history”. Much of the media’s focus, when reporting on his remarks, was on his attack on Facebook. While he certainly targeted Facebook, he also spoke about how Google, YouTube, and Twitter shape online discourse, and how they help…… Continue reading The greatest propaganda machine in history

Vicarious adventures with GoPro

Vicarious adventures with GoPro One of my new favourite YouTube channels is the GoPro channel. It’s an awesome channel for vicarious adventures, and some great music I wasn’t aware of. One of my favourite videos is this promo of the GoPro HERO6: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vr0qNXmkUJ8 The track in this video is A Moment Apart by Odesza, and…… Continue reading Vicarious adventures with GoPro

A curious sequence of events with Google and its YouTube recommendations

Well spotted there, Google! 🔭 I noticed a curious sequence of events this morning. I responded to a tweet about Donald Trump’s latest tweet where he referred to his “great and unmatched wisdom” using the Twitter app on my Android phone – I then turned to our Android TV box where we were watching YouTube…… Continue reading A curious sequence of events with Google and its YouTube recommendations

Neil deGrasse Tyson and I’m thinking about the laptop bag

Bursts of pink and red, dark lanes of mottled cosmic dust, and a bright scattering of stars — this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows part of a messy barred spiral galaxy known as NGC 428. It lies approximately 48 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Cetus (The Sea Monster). Although a spiral shape is still just about visible in this close-up shot, overall NGC 428’s spiral structure appears to be quite distorted and warped, thought to be a result of a collision between two galaxies. There also appears to be a substantial amount of star formation occurring within NGC 428 — another telltale sign of a merger. When galaxies collide their clouds of gas can merge, creating intense shocks and hot pockets of gas and often triggering new waves of star formation. NGC 428 was discovered by William Herschel in December 1786. More recently a type Ia supernova designated SN2013ct was discovered within the galaxy by Stuart Parker of the BOSS (Backyard Observatory Supernova Search) project in Australia and New Zealand, although it is unfortunately not visible in this image. This image was captured by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). A version of this image was entered into the Hubble’s Hidden Treasures Image Processing competition by contestants Nick Rose and the Flickr user penninecloud. Links: Nick Rose’s image on Flickr Penninecloud’s image on Flickr

I became a Neil deGrasse Tyson fan when I watched the series “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey” which I loved. deGrasse Tyson has a really interesting YouTube channel called “StarTalk Radio” which I just subscribed to and which you may also want to watch if you are into astrophysics.