Geeking out with IndieWeb and Micro.blog

Nathan mentioned me in a conversation recently that prompted me to revisit Micro.blog. I backed Micro.blog on Kickstarter initially, created my account when it launched, and then didn’t really return to it after initially testing it out.

I took another look today, and noticed that my blog posts have been shared to my Micro.blog feed automatically (I added my RSS feed, then forgot about it). I didn’t have a blog active over there, because I want to have this site as my primary blog.

Still, I poked around a little, and took some time to make more sense of what this Micro.blog thing is all about. Brent Simmons described how he sees Micro.blog fitting into the broader Web ecosystem nicely when he said the following:

Micro.blog is not an alternative silo: instead, it’s what you build when you believe that the web itself is the great social network.

This talk at the recent IndieWeb Summit also offered a nice overview of where Micro.blog is at the moment, and some of the challenges that lie ahead:

While I’m on the topic of IndieWeb, this “State of the IndieWeb” keynote is a great overview of what’s been going on in the IndieWeb community in the last year or so:

How can I do that?

On yet another related note, I came across Chris Aldrich’s reply to a tweet from one of my colleagues. The reply is interesting, in itself, but what I’m particularly curious about is how to create replies like this that publish to the source site, and populate the syndication link fields.

I’ve installed a series of IndieWeb plugins on my site, including –

  • Bridgy
  • IndieAuth
  • IndieWeb
  • Microformats 2
  • Micropub
  • Post Kinds
  • Symantic Linkbacks
  • Syndication Links
  • Web Actions
  • Webmention
  • Websub

The challenge, now, is figuring out how to use them to publish replies that cross-post, and so on. Installing the plugins is only part of the process. I’m pretty sure there’s a degree of configuration involved too to make it all work.

On the one hand, using these tools/extensions will transform your site from a “simple” blog into a pretty interactive, connected hub on the Web. On the other hand, this is not the sort of setup that mainstream users are going to want to configure.

This is where services like Micro.blog fit into the picture. It integrates a number of IndieWeb technologies to produce a pretty seamless experience.

9 thoughts on “Geeking out with IndieWeb and Micro.blog

    1. Hey Chris, thanks for getting back to me. Thanks for the link to your setup video. What I’ll do is watch that, and then head into the IndieWeb Chat or wikis for clarification on anything I’m unsure about.

      Hope you have a good week!

  1. @PaulJacobson, I am glad you are enjoying the return to micro.blog. …Funny that is how I find most of your posts.
    Glad you are trying to add the IndieWeb plugins to your site….They probably won’t work due to a lack of proper micoformats2 in your theme.
    We have been unsuccessful in getting the properties into the html of themes through the mf2 plug-in. You may want to try https://wordpress.org/plugins/mf2-feed/ instead.
    While this doesn’t rely on native microformats and uses rel=”alternate” to point to a copy with properly parsed data (side files are icky) it does allow for greater theme compatibility.
    microformats2, semantic linkbacks, and webmentions in core…now there is our dream.

    1. Hey Greg, thanks for the plugin suggestion. I’ll install that. Hopefully it will help with the metadata.

  2. @pauljacobson Good luck and also click on the webmention submenu under the iwc menu in the dashboard.
    You can add a box to people can send you manual webmentions.
    I am using your webmention endpoint to send you these by adding: wp-json/webmention/1.0/endpoint to you url
    the webmention plugin should add a dialogue box once you check the box.
    This should all work automatically…but we include a manual option.
     

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