Categories
People Photography Travel and places

Capturing your bucket shot

I enjoyed Peter McKinnon’s short film about his journey to achieving one of his goals, titled “Bucket Shot” –

His aim was to capture the popular Lake Moraine, with snow-covered mountains, while the lake was still liquid. It’s a beautiful scene, and well worth watching the film.

Featured image: Laurent Gass PHOTOGRAPHIE, licensed CC BY NC ND 2.0.

Categories
People Photography Science and nature Travel and places

The mountains won’t remember you

I really enjoyed Peter McKinnon‘s video titled “The Mountains Won’t Remember Me” for a few reasons. To begin with, his photography is awe inspiring. The video was created from a shoot in Banff, Canada. It’s probably one of the most beautiful regions I’ve every seen, albeit through McKinnon’s video.

The mountains, the hills, and the rivers in this video are idyllic. If I could live anywhere in the world, I’m pretty sure I’d want to spend most of my time there.

I also appreciated the central premise of the video – the enduring nature of these mountains, and their utter indifference to our day to day struggle to stand out, and be noticed.

Featured image by Will Tarpey
Categories
Design Photography Travel and places

Whale bones and shadows

We have a curious structure in one of our city parks that’s a little controversial. Some people really don’t like it, most aren’t sure what it’s supposed to represent. It appeals to me, although I can’t quite work out how to photograph it.

I took advantage of a couple evening walks past the park to take a few photos with my phone. Ideally, I’d like to head there one night with my DSLR and my tripod, and try out a few angles and exposures.

I particularly like the shadows at night. Definitely worth exploring when I have some time on one evening.

Categories
Travel and places

Family trip to the Eretz Israel Museum

We had national elections in Israel this last Tuesday, 9 April. Elections days are public holidays in Israel, so we took advantage of the day off to have a family outing. We decided to head to the Eretz Israel Museum in Tel Aviv.

I had been to the museum a couple times with our kids, but this was the first time we all went as a family.

There’s a lot to like about this museum. There are a number of static exhibits, and new exhibits that arrive from time to time.

By the time we arrived at the museum, it was almost lunchtime, so we had an early lunch at a restaurant just outside the museum called Anina. The food is pretty good, albeit it a little pricey.

We took advantage of the Election Day public holiday to have a family outing in Tel Aviv, at the Eretz Israel Museum.

The museum is more like a campus comprising various buildings housing exhibits, with a number of outdoor exhibits too. We started off in the Kadman exhibit that basically traces the origins of money both in the region, and in general, leading up to the New Israeli Shekel that we use today in Israel.

The Glass Pavilion is pretty impressive too. We pretty much had the hall to ourselves. There was a fun exhibit documenting aspects of Israeli society with glassware, along with a variety of other pieces.

One of the highlights of this exhibit was a suit of armour made from glass.

From there, we moved on to a temporary exhibit that documented the work of Israeli photographer, David Rubinger. I was familiar with one or two of his photographs without realising who he was.

The photographer, David Rubinger, the Israel Prize laureate for Communication who died last year was one of a small selected group of photographers whose works are etched on local and international memory. His endeavor began at the end of the enlisted “Zionist photography” period, that dominated the local photography scene until the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948.

Eretz Israel Museum

I really enjoyed this exhibit. Looking at his photographs, I’m reminded that you don’t need the best of modern cameras to create meaningful, even profound, images.

We had an interesting experience when we stepped outside the exhibit. I took a little longer inside, and my wife and kids were waiting for me on a bench outside. I wanted to take a photo or two of the three of them on the bench, and we were interrupted by the exhibit’s usher who wanted us to rather take photos with some flowers she planted in the background.

This turned into a bit of a “lost in translation” family photo opportunity when the usher took my camera, and then spent a good 10 to 15 minutes getting us into position. My wife wrote about the experience on her blog:

My wife’s account of our impromptu family photo, and a pot of flowers that had to be featured in the photo.

One of the benefits of this experience with the usher was that she pointed us to another exhibit I hadn’t visited before. The Ethnography and Folklore exhibit is is a rich exhibit of Judaica that includes a recreation of an 18th century Italian synagogue, complete with its original doors, and ark.

We wandered through a couple of other exhibits along the way, including a flour mill, an olive oil press, and a few outdoors features.

It’s easily one of my favourite vacation destinations. There are a couple of other really great museums in the area, so if you’re looking for something to do, definitely consider spending a few hours at the Eretz Israel Museum.

Categories
People Photography

Erik Witsoe’s timeless photography

One of the photographers I follow is Erik Witsoe. I see his work when I scroll through my Flickr feed, and I really like his style. His “Time Pieces” photograph caught my attention this morning:

Time Pieces
Erik Witsoe | BLOG | Facebook | Medium | 500px | Twitter | Instagram | Flickr
Warsaw, Poland
Autumn

Here are two more that I pulled from his Flickr feed:

Enchanted Märchen
Enchanted Märchen

Erik Witsoe | BLOG | Facebook | Medium | 500px | Twitter | Instagram | Flickr
Poznan, Poland
Park Solacki
Autumn
Climb
Climb

Erik Witsoe | BLOG | Facebook | Medium | 500px | Twitter | Instagram | Flickr
Warsaw, Poland
Autumn
Metro

You can also follow his blog for stories behind some of his work. A great example is his “Street Spirit” post:


unsplash-logoFeatured image by S A R A H ✗ S H A R P
Categories
Design Devices Miscellany Photography

Colourful computer history

I love James Ball’s colourful photographic history of computers.

These machines are grossly under-powered compared to the devices we use today. Still, they’re a wonderful reminder of how far we’ve come, and what lies ahead for us in technological terms. This Telefunken RA770 (circa 1970) is one of my favourites:

Via The Stylish & Colorful Computing Machines of Yesteryear by Jason Kottke

Categories
Books People Photography

A terrific way to spend a weekend

This looks like an awesome way to spend a relaxing weekend, actually.

Categories
Photography Travel and places

Organ music and roller skating at the Moonlight Rollerway

Dominic, the owner of Moonlight Rollerway, playing organ music
“Dominic, the owner of Moonlight Rollerway, plays the organ there every Tuesday night.” – Lisa Whiteman

I love stories like this one about the Moonlight Rollerway by Lisa Whiteman. Mostly I enjoy the photographs of what seems to be to be fragments of Americana/American nostalgia that speak to a very different time.

Every Tuesday night, Lillian Tomasino laces up her roller skates, puts her arms around her partner, and glides in sweeping circles across the floor of Moonlight Rollerway. Holding each other like ballroom dancers, she and Tom Clayton move effortlessly to the jaunty, classic tunes played live on a Hammond organ above the Glendale, California, rink.

Via “Throwback: LA roller rink still has a weekly organ night” on Kottke.org (one of my favourite blogs).