Categories
People Photography Travel and places

Serendipitous discovery leads to David Tewes photographic exhibition

Your Shutter bug

Chris Finke, a colleague at Automattic, discovered a box of slides that were taken by the late David Tewes, Chris’ father-in-law’s cousin while Chris and his wife were going through his late father-in-law’s things.

According to MPR News

On a spring day three years ago, Chris and Christina Finke were clearing out a building on the hobby farm near Mayer. It belonged to Christina’s dad, Doug Tewes, who had died a few years before.

“We’re deciding, you know, what stuff is going to go to Goodwill? What are we going to try and sell? What are we going to get rid of?” Chris Finke recalled.

Then he spotted something different on a shelf, in the back of the attic, where the roof met the wall. It was a hard-sided case. Inside were hundreds of old photographic slides.

Hidden for decades, work of Minnesota photographer gets its own museum exhibit | MPR News

Chris’ discovery prompted him to scan the slides, and publish them on a website, David Tewes, Shutterbug – The Mid-Century Photography of David Tewes, where the staff at the Minnesota Marine Art Museum in Winona noticed them, and reached out to Chris about exhibiting them.

The collection is a wonderful series of snapshots of mid-20th century America.

This collection appeals to me because it’s a wonderful reminder about the importance of preserving our memories as we travel through this life.

It also reminds of of my goal of digitising my late father’s slides. My Dad’s photography may not be exhibition-worthy, but they contain priceless memories from my family.

Chris has licensed the photographs under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license:


Shutter Bug by David Tewes is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at https://davidtewes.com.
Categories
Photography Travel and places

Pretty sunset yesterday

A pretty sunset in central Israel

I thought I’d capture our sunset yesterday evening, as a panorama. It was pretty!

Categories
People Photography Travel and places

Capturing your bucket shot

I enjoyed Peter McKinnon’s short film about his journey to achieving one of his goals, titled “Bucket Shot” –

His aim was to capture the popular Lake Moraine, with snow-covered mountains, while the lake was still liquid. It’s a beautiful scene, and well worth watching the film.

Featured image: Laurent Gass PHOTOGRAPHIE, licensed CC BY NC ND 2.0.

Categories
People Photography Science and nature Travel and places

The mountains won’t remember you

I really enjoyed Peter McKinnon‘s video titled “The Mountains Won’t Remember Me” for a few reasons. To begin with, his photography is awe inspiring. The video was created from a shoot in Banff, Canada. It’s probably one of the most beautiful regions I’ve every seen, albeit through McKinnon’s video.

The mountains, the hills, and the rivers in this video are idyllic. If I could live anywhere in the world, I’m pretty sure I’d want to spend most of my time there.

I also appreciated the central premise of the video – the enduring nature of these mountains, and their utter indifference to our day to day struggle to stand out, and be noticed.

Featured image by Will Tarpey
Categories
Events and Life Photography

Accumulating memories in large photo libraries

Jamie Rubin wrote a thought-provoking post on his blog about his accumulated library of photographs, and his thoughts about what to do with it.

The problem is that I am not organized about my photos the way I am in other parts of my life. I’ve made reluctant attempts at organization now and then, but my heart was never in it. I’ve had all kinds of great ideas for photo taxonomies that would allow me to put my finger on a photo within seconds. These ideas never pan out. I just don’t have the interest. And yet the photos accrue.

Jamie Rubin

I commented on the post, and then thought I’d share my thoughts here too.


I have around 100k images in my Flickr library (this is probably my most complete, and organised library outside my various backups). I sometimes wonder if accumulating such a huge library will be problematic for my family when I eventually shuffle off into the Great Darkroom in the Sky.

On balance, though, I’d much rather preserve these memories, than start stripping them away because they seem too voluminous. I’m pretty determined to document our lives, and our memories for future generations. I wrote a bit about this in this post, so I won’t elaborate much here.

When I look at what I have from my childhood, and from previous generations, I see moments now and then, certainly not complete pictures of what those times were like. I rely on photos to remember my past because my memory can be pretty spotty.

When it comes to my growing library of photos, I’m working on the assumption that image recognition technology will only improve over time, and our kids will be able to use it to find the stuff that matters to them. If I look at how good Google Photos is now when it comes to recognising subject matter in photos, and even filtering photos, I’m less and less concerned about the size of my library.

I think Jamie make a great point about being mindful of the moment we’re in, and not immediately distracting ourselves from it by taking a photograph of the scene. We can’t spend all our lives looking through a viewfinder.

unsplash-logoFeatured image by Julie Johnson
Categories
Design Photography Travel and places

Whale bones and shadows

We have a curious structure in one of our city parks that’s a little controversial. Some people really don’t like it, most aren’t sure what it’s supposed to represent. It appeals to me, although I can’t quite work out how to photograph it.

I took advantage of a couple evening walks past the park to take a few photos with my phone. Ideally, I’d like to head there one night with my DSLR and my tripod, and try out a few angles and exposures.

I particularly like the shadows at night. Definitely worth exploring when I have some time on one evening.

Categories
Coding Design Education Miscellany Photography Useful stuff

Opportunistic diversions for 2019-04-17

I watched a couple interesting videos that I enjoyed, and thought I’d share:

This Engadget video about the differences between DSLR and mirrorless cameras is terrific. Chris Schodt did a great job explaining both camera categories, and the advantages each type has. Well worth watching.


Leonardo Da Vinci was clearly a remarkable person, and this Vox Almanac video by Phil Edwards highlights just how perceptive Da Vinci was.

You can find a few more related links in Edwards’ post “How Leonardo da Vinci made a “satellite” map in 1502 – Vox“.


I work with CSS every day as part of my work at Automattic, and while I’ve encountered pseudo elements, I haven’t really understood them until I watched Kevin Powell‘s video.

This video is the first of a three part series, and just having watched this first episode, I feel like I already have a better understanding.

unsplash-logoFeatured image by Victoriano Izquierdo

I’m trying out a post format for sharing a few quick things that probably wouldn’t make for a decent length post. I like the idea of this sort of collection of interesting things, but it feels a little disjointed. Perhaps three short posts would work better. What do you think?

Categories
People Photography

Whiteboarding future greatness

I really like this photo that Kelsey shared on Flickr. What I like about this are the shadows, and the contrasts on the whiteboard.