Categories
Mindsets Writing

Facing a blank page

A blank page can be a little intimidating as a writer. Staring at a blank page and being unable to fill it with something intelligible is a common experience of writer’s block, the bane of most writers. I say “most” because there are probably some writers who find the challenge of writer’s block to be just the thing they need to break through it.

I’m not one of those writers.

Lately I’ve realized that despite all the writing that I do in my day job, I don’t do much personal writing. When I realise this and decide to start writing more frequently, I go utterly blank.

Well, that isn’t entirely accurate. I have ideas that I want to write about but they seem to fade awfully quickly and seem silly the next day so I shelve them.

One of my most effective muses when I do write is my collection of feeds and I came across a very appropriate item that I want to share. Brain Pickings has a post titled “Facing the Blank Page: Celebrated Writers on How to Overcome Creative Block” that includes a video with snippets of interviews from various writers about the dreaded blank page:

It is a highlights video drawing on a series of slightly longer interviews with each writer that were published by the Louisiana Channel on YouTube:

I think I resonated most with Philipp Meyer’s and Lydia Davis’ thoughts about the blank page but each interview is worth watching if you, like me, find yourself staring at a blank page frustratingly often.

You can find the Brain Pickings post with selected quotes here:

Facing the Blank Page: Celebrated Writers on How to Overcome Creative Block

Image credit: Pixabay

Categories
People Writing

Om Malik’s advice on writing good blog posts

Om Malik is comfortably one of my favourite writers and he has published advice on writing good blog posts which he used to send to new writers at GigaOm. His post is titled “How to write a good blog post”:

How to write a good blog post 

When I think about bloggers/writers who I admire, Om Malik is in my top 5 or 6 writers and I love his article. I highlighted so much of his article for my own reference purposes but two of the sentences that really stand out for me are these two:

So the trick is to write posts that are more informed, more insightful, and more respectful of the readers. In my opinion, you are informed not just by talking to people but by being able to take the time to learn about things you like to write about.

These aren’t the only gems, of course. Orli Yakuel pointed out another wonderful quote on Facebook:

If you are a blogger/writer and you are passionate about your writing, read Malik’s post. Better yet, subscribe to his blog or follow him on Twitter.

Update (2016-03-29): I may have referred to this before but this January 2016 piece by Malik is also worth reading:

How to keep writing when nobody gives a shit?

Photo credit: Om Malik by Christopher Michel, licensed CC BY 2.0