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Games People Podcasting Wellbeing

Just geek out and walk

I just went out for a walk in a nearby park. That shouldn’t be particularly noteworthy except for the times we find ourselves in. What made the walk especially enjoyable (well, aside from being out in glorious weather), was the opportunity to just geek out over this interview with Felicia Day on the Id10t podcast a while ago:

I loved her appearance in Critical Role, Campaign One, in the Trial of the Take adventures (parts 1 and 2):

As an aside: I really enjoyed watching Mary Elizabeth McGlynn, Wil Wheaton, and Will Friedle playing Dungeons & Dragons. I think Gina and I binged the four episodes (episodes 3 and 4 are here and here) over the course of a few days.

Anyway, back to that Felicia Day interview. The more of her work I see or hear, the more I appreciate that she does what she does. Her interview gives some wonderful insights into her personality, and even some of the services she uses day to day (at least at the time of the interview – I love these sorts of insights especially).

I’ve been listening to podcasts when I run, and go for walks (it helps with the monotony of the paths I have to keep to with local restrictions on movement due to COVID-19), and I’ve had this one queued for a while now. It’s well worth listening to if you’re a Felicia Day fan.

Categories
Blogs and blogging Mindsets People Publishing Semantic Web

Rethinking Mastodon

I’ve been pretty interested in Mastodon as a Twitter alternative, at least until I noticed Brent Simmons’ post.

He linked to Wil Wheaton’s post titled “The world is a terrible place right now, and that’s largely because it is what we make it” in which Wheaton described a particularly unpleasant, and unexpected experience on Mastodon:

I thought that if I left Twitter, I could find a new social network that would give it some competition (Twitter’s monopoly on the social space is a big reason it can ignore people who are abused and harassed, while punishing people for reporting their attackers), so I fired up this account I made at Mastodon a long time ago.

I thought I’d find something different. I thought I’d find a smaller community that was more like Twitter was way back in 2008 or 2009. Cat pictures! Jokes! Links to interesting things that we found in the backwaters of the internet! Interaction with friends we just haven’t met, yet! What I found was … not that.

I’m sure that Wheaton’s experience of Mastodon doesn’t describe all Mastodon interactions. The same could be said of Twitter. In both cases, the trollish elements spoil the experience for everyone else.

His experience doesn’t exactly inspire confidence in Mastodon as a more civil alternative to Twitter. This isn’t because Mastodon is fundamentally bad, it’s just being used by people who are behaving much the same as other people on Twitter who I’d prefer to avoid having to deal with.

I’ll just stick with my blog, and some sort of Micro.blog hook for now.

Categories
Mindsets Wellbeing

Swimming and anxiety

I just watched a short documentary, titled “Waterlog”, about writer Joe Minihane’s journey towards a better understanding of his anxiety, and a healthier perspective on his life through “wild swimming“:

One of Minihane’s insights is that it’s cathartic to talk about experiences with anxiety, depression, and other conditions. This reminds me of how Wil Wheaton makes a point of speaking, and writing, openly about his experiences with depression, panic attacks, and more.

http://wilwheaton.net/2018/05/my-name-is-wil-wheaton-i-live-with-chronic-depression-and-i-am-not-ashamed/

It’s inspiring to read about people like Joe Minihane, and Wil Wheaton who have the courage to speak openly about their challenges. It’s easy to be overwhelmed by anxiety and depression, and pretty tough to find your way out of it when it happens.

Stories like these offer more hope that it can get better.