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Events and Life Mindsets Wellbeing

Reality tapping you on the shoulder

My family suffered a tragic loss this week due to the coronavirus. Last night, I read Om Malik’s post “The Pain of Distance“, and noticing reality tapping you on the shoulder –

If this is how I feel, I can’t even internalize how my mom must be feeling. She said it is cold. She didn’t even tell us about the fever. She can’t remember parts of the day. Even staying awake is tough. She is trying to be brave. She keeps saying it is nothing. And my dad is behaving as if there is nothing wrong. It is all so strange and all so sudden. You don’t realize the reality is just tapping you on the shoulder.

The Pain of Distance – On my Om

It’s easier to ignore a “common” cold. We see them every year, they’re part of our annual routines. Even that virus takes its victims every year, but we have a vaccine to help with it.

With COVID-19, we don’t have that. It doesn’t take long from the time you start to feel the effects of the virus, until you find yourself in a hospital bed (if you’re fortunate to have access to one, and act on the warning signs early enough), facing your mortality.

Pay attention when you feel reality tapping you on the shoulder.

Beyond that –

  1. Wear your mask over your mouth and nose;
  2. Wash your hands for 20 seconds, frequently;
  3. Keep a safe distance from others.

If not for yourself, do it for your family, and loved ones.

Categories
Events and Life Mindsets Wellbeing

Tragedy of Normalcy in the Coronavirus Shadow

When I walk around the city, and go for my runs, I see Israeli kids playing in water fountains, while their parents watch on. Few of them are wearing masks, or maintaining a reasonable distance from friends and relatives. Despite that, I empathise with people who lived in the coronavirus shadow during our initial lockdown, wanting to return to some semblance of normalcy.

In the shadow of a looming disaster

Then, I look around again, and I see how only a few wear masks over their mouths and noses, and make an effort to keep a safe distance. I feel like I’m watching a movie scene where people are unaware that their lives are about to be horribly torn apart by some unseen enemy.

Because that’s what seems to be happening here, in Israel, as we increasingly see headlines like this:

Virus infection numbers vault to record-breaking 859 cases in 24 hours

Virus infection numbers vault to record-breaking 859 cases in 24 hours | The Times of Israel

As much as I want everything to go back to how it all was before this virus fractured our society, I don’t think we can ever go back to the freedom we had before. Certainly not unless someone discovers a wondrous vaccine that reduces COVID-19 to a minor cold for the majority of our neighbours.

In the meantime, I see too many families behaving as if wearing masks is just a formality to avoid a fine from the police. Masks have become a fashion accessory for chins, and elbows for most of the people I see around me.

Some wear masks covering their mouths and noses, but not enough. For everyone else, the sun is shining, and there’s no need to keep apart. In the meantime, the virus’ resurgence started in schools, and instead of being horrified, we see school graduation events that cluster kids close together for dances, and photo opportunities.

Outrage doesn’t help. I just feel waves of sadness when I see this, and hope that perhaps there is some sort of magical bubble to protect our friends, and neighbours this time around.

This coronavirus is an insidious thing

This coronavirus is an insidious thing. It separates us at our weakest, and pulls families apart when they desperately need to be together. Parents diagnosed with COVID-19 are sequestered into hospital wards, and isolated from their families, fervently hoping/praying for their recovery, fearing that they may not.

I had a terrible thought: Imagine if a child becomes ill, and is isolated in one of these hospital wards. Will their parents be able to visit them, comfort them, or will their child be forced to face the fear of being sick, in a clinical environment, where they could lose their fight, alone?

It’s a truly awful thought, and yet we’re not doing nearly enough to keep our children, and ourselves safe.

When I look around at the people I pass, they don’t seem to have contemplated the nightmare that this virus could visit on them, and their families. Perhaps they don’t want to contemplate it, and prefer to pretend that everything is ok.

A cliché in Israel is the phrase: “הכל בסדר” – “Everything is ok”. It isn’t, and it won’t be for a while yet.


Photo by Andrew Seaman on Unsplash

Categories
Events and Life Mindsets

Cute animal bubbles and happy things

There are days when the world seems to be the equivalent of a Monday morning without coffee. My wife’s answer to these sorts of days and the accompanying deluge of darkness and misery on social media is bubbles:

So instead of getting rid of the baby with the bath water I’m adding bubbles. Lots and lots of happy, shiny bubbles. OK, mostly accounts involving adorably cute animals. Cute animal bubbles!

Sometimes bubbles are just what we need. That and to ignore social media for a while.

This also helps:

Image credit: Clem Onojeghuo

Categories
Events and Life

The tragedy of Aleppo, explained

The tragedy of Aleppo seems to have gone largely unnoticed by most of the world. It’s not easy to pay close, sustained attention to events that are so devastating and horrific over such a long period of time.

Watching this video, I can almost understand why other major powers didn’t do more to stop this. It is the sort of event that could easily give rise to a global conflict. At the same time, what does this say about humanity and this new world order we are heading into?

Here is the bigger picture of the protracted civil war in Syria: