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Science and nature

Our home on a cloudy day in May 1969

May 18, 1969 - Apollo 10 View of the Earth
A view of Earth from 36,000 nautical miles away as photographed from the Apollo 10 spacecraft during its trans-lunar journey toward the moon. While the Yucatan Peninsula is obscured by clouds, nearly all of Mexico north of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec can be clearly delineated. Image Credit: NASA

One of the many things I like about having a Chromecast is seeing images like this beautiful photograph of our home planet on a cloudy day in May 1969, courtesy of NASA’s Image of the Day initiative.

Source: NASA

Categories
Science and nature

A butterfly nebula with a 3 light-year wingspan

I made the mistake of scrolling through my Twitter feed earlier. I saw the usual drama about a certain crazy person. I was about to go find a strong drink when I saw this amazing image of this butterfly nebula that I had to share.

The bright clusters and nebulae of planet Earth’s night sky are often named for flowers or insects. Though its wingspan covers over 3 light-years, NGC 6302 is no exception. With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the dying central star of this particular planetary nebula has become exceptionally hot, shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust. This sharp close-up of the dying star’s nebula was recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope an

Who says science isn’t cool? Well, that crazy guy and his friends do but they don’t seem to have a handle on things anyway.

You can view the full resolution image of the Butterfly Nebula by clicking on this link. It is even more impressive up close.

Source: APOD: 2017 February 8 – The Butterfly Nebula from Hubble

Categories
Events and Life Science and nature

A reminder about our perceived differences

A spectacular reminder that our perceived differences are just that.

NASA astronaut Doug Wheelock tweeted this photo with the caption “It’s Tuesday; And you’re beautiful; And it’ll be exactly the same tomorrow…only Wednesday.” .

If you love photos like this, be sure to take a look at this collection:

Categories
Science and nature

Looking back to see the Moon passing over the Earth

NASA released images of the Moon passing over the Earth that looks unreal … literally. We are used to photos of the Moon from our vantage point down here and on its own. This almost looks like an illustration, especially when you consider that the side of the Moon we see in this photo is the “dark side” we almost never see from Earth.

This animation still image shows the far side of the moon, illuminated by the sun, as it crosses between the DISCOVR spacecraft’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) camera and telescope, and the Earth – one million miles away.

According to NASA’s blog post titled “From a Million Miles Away, NASA Camera Shows Moon Crossing Face of Earth” –

The images were captured by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC), a four megapixel CCD camera and telescope on the DSCOVR satellite orbiting 1 million miles from Earth. From its position between the sun and Earth, DSCOVR conducts its primary mission of real-time solar wind monitoring for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The blog post explains that the photos are actually composites from “three separate monochrome exposures taken by the camera in quick succession”. The Flickr post also mentioned that the telescope that took these photos with a four megapixel CCD camera! I was wondering about the colour distortion on the right edge of the Moon (more visible in the still photo) and the post explains as follows:

Combining three images taken about 30 seconds apart as the moon moves produces a slight but noticeable camera artifact on the right side of the moon. Because the moon has moved in relation to the Earth between the time the first (red) and last (green) exposures were made, a thin green offset appears on the right side of the moon when the three exposures are combined. This natural lunar movement also produces a slight red and blue offset on the left side of the moon in these unaltered images.

Here is a cool video made from the still images:

And then, when you look in the other direction far off into space, you see amazing sights like this image of a storm in the Lagoon Nebula in the Sagittarius constellation:

Stormy seas in Sagittarius

Images from the NASA Goddard Flight Center, licensed CC BY 2.0

Categories
Photography Travel and places

Bed-time in space

I am a sucker for astronauts’ photos from space stations around our planet and this bed-time in space photo from Samantha Cristoforetti is spectacular.

Good night from space

Categories
Science and nature

The amazing space we live in

This is a stunning representation of some of the things we may see when we travel through interstellar space:

Categories
Photography

Seeing the stars from the International Space Station

This is a striking view from the ISS. Two things stand out for me. The first is how many more stars you can see from space and the second is that bubble around our planet, out atmosphere.