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Events and Life Mindsets Music

Comforting familiarity

Jamie Rubin wrote about waning motivation, and comforting familiarity yesterday –

Maybe it is familiarity during a time of uncertainty that I find comforting. The unknowns pull the levers of anxiety. Because of this, I have to limit myself to thinking about today and not worrying too much about what may happen tomorrow. When I start to think about tomorrow, or the next week, I find that my motivation is sapped just a little bit more.

No Motivation | Jamie Todd Rubin

We do find familiarity comforting. I’ve had a 80s playlist on Spotify on heavy rotation lately, and I realised earlier that it’s probably because this is my comforting familiarity.

Whatever works, and helps make each day a little lighter, and more productive, right?

At the same time, we’re in a challenging time. The pandemic challenges our ideas about how we live, how we relate to each other, and what “normal” is.

Perhaps this is also about tempering this unnerving change with familiarity to help us adapt better?

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Music

Winter thrills with Vivaldi

I really enjoy Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons, and I’ve been listening to variations of a few of the movements/pieces/parts (I’m not sure what the terminology is) from Four Seasons in the last day or so.

Two of my favourites are these:

I’ve also really enjoyed watching different performances on YouTube, such as these:

We’re expecting rain in the coming week. It will be a perfect opportunity to play one of these pieces for dramatic effect when a storm arrives. Just for fun.

unsplash-logoBaher Khairy
Categories
Applications Music

Spotify recommendations are spot on today

I’ve been listening to one of my Spotify Daily Mixes that comprises instrumental movie and TV soundtracks. It has been giving me some excellent choices, many of which I haven’t heard before.

I’m really impressed! Here are a couple tracks that have become new favourites:

If only my YouTube recommendations for videos were as accurate!

Categories
Events and Life Music People Travel and places

Music in the park with Tal Kravitz

Tal Kravitz performed at one of our city’s annual Autumn music festival events in a neighbourhood park yesterday. According to his bio on his Facebook Page

Tal Kravitz is a musician and a singer educated at Israel’s finest music institutions. He is also a traveler who journeyed on a personal search for original tribal music in far corners of the world not yet exposed to Western civilization. Tal plays piano, harp, guitar, a variety of bagpipes, the musical saw, African percussion instruments and more.

We really enjoyed the event. Kravitz is really engaging, and involves the audience (who loved him).

Fortunately we arrived early enough to find good seats. I took advantage of that for some photographs.

Kravitz used a range of musical instruments including an Irish harp, a saw (the kind you use to cut wood), bagpipes, and some sort of electromagnetic/sonic device.

Categories
Music People

My introduction to Narkis and Claire Guerreso

I’ve been listening to two artists I hadn’t come across until recently. The first artist who’s new to me is an Israeli artist/band called Narkis. I head their song ״ממה אתה בורח״ (“What are you running from?”) in a Spotify playlist titled ״בדרך״ yesterday, and I’m obsessed:

I went looking for a music video for this song, and this video is the closest I’ve come to seeing this song performed live – what a presence!


Another artist I started listening to, and enjoy, is Claire Guerreso, whose track “Ashes” was featured in a powerful scene on the TV show, Lucifer, that my wife and I have been binging for the last month or so:

This track is wonderful, and a powerful theme for that particular scene in the show. Another terrific track is “Skipping Stones”:

unsplash-logoFeatured image by BRUNO CERVERA
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Music Wellbeing

Feeling a bit better with this song

I’ve had a rough week or two with more anxiety and depression than usual. Music tends to help my mood, and “Like Gold” by Vance Joy is one of those songs for me:

Actually, I’m really enjoying Vance Joy generally at the moment. Here’a a great playlist to binge with:

Categories
Music Wellbeing

The music that helps get me up those hills

I’ve been running for the last two months (not continuously), and I’ve experimented with some sort of audio accompaniment to help pass the time.

I started off listening to podcasts, and while this helped me get through more of my podcast backlog, listening to podcasts doesn’t really give me that extra oompf to get up the hills.

So I switched over to some music. I started off with “9 Dead Alive” by Rodrigo y Gabriela, but then it disappeared from Spotify (for me at least). I then bought the album, and loaded it onto my phone to play through another audio app on my phone

That worked for a run or two until I felt the need for something different. In the past, I’ve tended to go for movie soundtracks when I worked out, specifically instrumental soundtracks. With music from the likes of Batman, the Flash, and more, the playlist definitely has the drama to get up those hills.

Still, it didn’t quite hit the spot for me. So I looked at some of the music I’ve been listening to lately, and came up with my current “Going for a run” playlist:

This music isn’t exactly what you’d hear in a gym, or otherwise associate with some sort of workout but what I like about these songs is that they tend to have a great cadence for my current running pace.

I’ve used this playlist for about a week or so, and so far it’s helped move me along my current route at a decent pace.

unsplash-logoFeatured image by Jenny Hill
Categories
Music Science and nature Travel and places

A musical journey over the Moon with Clair de Lune

This visualization uses a digital 3D model of the Moon built from global elevation maps and image mosaics by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission. It was created to accompany a performance of Claude Debussy’s Clair de Lune by the National Symphony Orchestra Pops, led by conductor Emil de Cou, at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC, on June 1 and 2, 2018, as part of a celebration of NASA’s 60th anniversary.

Clair de Lune (moonlight in French) was published in 1905, as the third of four movements in the composer’s Suite Bergamasque, and unlike the other parts of this work, Clair is quiet, contemplative, and slightly melancholy, evoking the feeling of a solitary walk through a moonlit garden.

The visuals were composed like a nature documentary, with clean cuts and a mostly stationary virtual camera. The viewer follows the Sun throughout a lunar day, seeing sunrises and then sunsets over prominent features on the Moon. The sprawling ray system surrounding Copernicus crater, for example, is revealed beneath receding shadows at sunrise and later slips back into darkness as night encroaches.

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4655

Clair de Lune 4K Version – Moon Images from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter – YouTube