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Design Events and Life People

… you can create blocks like it’s 1999

I’m watching Matt Mullenweg’s “State of the Word 2019” from the recent WordCamp US, and almost snorted my tea when he had this to say about the new colour gradients feature for blocks in Gutenberg v6.8:

You can create blocks like it’s 1999 …

Matt Mullenweg, speaking at WCUS 2019

😂

You can find Matt’s keynote here:

Luke Chesser
Categories
Applications Blogs and blogging Design Useful stuff

Watch this if you’re still on the fence about the new WordPress Editor (aka Gutenberg)

If you’re still unsure about the new WordPress Editor (aka Gutenberg), it’s worth watching Matt Mullenweg’s State of the Word keynote at the recent WordCamp US 2018 event in Nashville.

You can find links to parts of the talk, along with slides, and commentary in Matt’s post, here:

I’ve been using the new Editor almost exclusively lately, not because I work for Automattic, but because it’s actually a pretty enjoyable way to write posts.

I still prefer to write longer posts in my text editor, and then add the posts into the editor afterwards (I’ve always been a little twitchy about my only version of long posts being in an online editor, just in case something goes pear shaped and I lose it all).

The new Editor isn’t perfect, but it’s pretty good! It does work a little differently in some respects, but that isn’t a bad thing (necessarily). Also, it’s improving (I can add galleries that work the way they’re supposed to! Yay!) all the time.

Categories
Blogs and blogging People

Read Matt Mullenweg’s Gutenberg FAQ

Matt Mullenweg (my boss*) has published a Gutenberg FAQ that you should read if you’re interested in Gutenberg (aka, the new WordPress Editor aka the block editor), the upcoming WordPress 5.0 release, and the accessibility debate about Gutenberg.

Read Matt’s Gutenberg FAQ

*In case you weren’t aware, I work for Automattic (the company behind WordPress.com). I don’t speak for Automattic, but I do believe in our mission, and love working there.

By the way, we’re hiring!

Categories
Blogs and blogging Writing

The Web is still important for writing

I clicked on a link to a 2014 post by Matt Mullenweg titled “Why the Web Still Matters for Writing” after I scanned through another recent post and I thought I’d reshare it here:

Why the Web Still Matters for Writing

I especially like this quote:

But the web is like water: it fills in all the gaps between things like gaming and social with exactly what any one particular user wants. And while we all might have a use for Facebook – simply because everyone is there – we all have different things that interest us when it comes to reading.

I have this recurring thought that the Web is a wonderful platform for writing and publishing and, if we weren’t all so caught up in various models of control, we may be more open to publishing more stuff to the Web, natively. It just makes so much sense to me as an open and flexible platform (and one of the motivations for my newest project). It’s also why I love the idea of authors publishing books online as well as in the usual digital and print formats.

A great example of an author who has done this (and possibly for similar reasons) is Jeff Jarvis who decided to publish his latest book, Geeks Bearing Gifts, on Medium in stages.

While I’m on this topic, here is another gem I found on Mullenweg’s blog titled “On Syndication and Rolling Your Own“. It goes all the way back to 2003, those early days of blogging:

On Syndication and Rolling Your Own

Remember that this was before Facebook, Twitter and much of the social Web we have today. It was also a couple months before WordPress was first released.

Image credit: Foundry from Pixabay, released under a CC0 Dedication

Categories
People

Matt Mullenweg, one of the good guys

Matt Cutts tweeted about a great profile of Matt Mullenweg, one of the main people behind WordPress:

Matt Mullenweg, the Houston-born-and-bred founding developer of the ubiquitous WordPress blogging platform, is now a multimillionaire who was recently named one of the 10 people most actively “changing the face of the Internet.”