Categories
Travel and places

Family trip to the Eretz Israel Museum

We had national elections in Israel this last Tuesday, 9 April. Elections days are public holidays in Israel, so we took advantage of the day off to have a family outing. We decided to head to the Eretz Israel Museum in Tel Aviv.

I had been to the museum a couple times with our kids, but this was the first time we all went as a family.

There’s a lot to like about this museum. There are a number of static exhibits, and new exhibits that arrive from time to time.

By the time we arrived at the museum, it was almost lunchtime, so we had an early lunch at a restaurant just outside the museum called Anina. The food is pretty good, albeit it a little pricey.

We took advantage of the Election Day public holiday to have a family outing in Tel Aviv, at the Eretz Israel Museum.

The museum is more like a campus comprising various buildings housing exhibits, with a number of outdoor exhibits too. We started off in the Kadman exhibit that basically traces the origins of money both in the region, and in general, leading up to the New Israeli Shekel that we use today in Israel.

The Glass Pavilion is pretty impressive too. We pretty much had the hall to ourselves. There was a fun exhibit documenting aspects of Israeli society with glassware, along with a variety of other pieces.

One of the highlights of this exhibit was a suit of armour made from glass.

From there, we moved on to a temporary exhibit that documented the work of Israeli photographer, David Rubinger. I was familiar with one or two of his photographs without realising who he was.

The photographer, David Rubinger, the Israel Prize laureate for Communication who died last year was one of a small selected group of photographers whose works are etched on local and international memory. His endeavor began at the end of the enlisted “Zionist photography” period, that dominated the local photography scene until the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948.

Eretz Israel Museum

I really enjoyed this exhibit. Looking at his photographs, I’m reminded that you don’t need the best of modern cameras to create meaningful, even profound, images.

We had an interesting experience when we stepped outside the exhibit. I took a little longer inside, and my wife and kids were waiting for me on a bench outside. I wanted to take a photo or two of the three of them on the bench, and we were interrupted by the exhibit’s usher who wanted us to rather take photos with some flowers she planted in the background.

This turned into a bit of a “lost in translation” family photo opportunity when the usher took my camera, and then spent a good 10 to 15 minutes getting us into position. My wife wrote about the experience on her blog:

My wife’s account of our impromptu family photo, and a pot of flowers that had to be featured in the photo.

One of the benefits of this experience with the usher was that she pointed us to another exhibit I hadn’t visited before. The Ethnography and Folklore exhibit is is a rich exhibit of Judaica that includes a recreation of an 18th century Italian synagogue, complete with its original doors, and ark.

We wandered through a couple of other exhibits along the way, including a flour mill, an olive oil press, and a few outdoors features.

It’s easily one of my favourite vacation destinations. There are a couple of other really great museums in the area, so if you’re looking for something to do, definitely consider spending a few hours at the Eretz Israel Museum.

Categories
Blogs and blogging Design

Revisit the history of WordPress with this awesome WordPress time machine

One of my colleagues shared this awesome, interactive history of WordPress. I remember the first release version. There was something about it that I really liked, compared to the other options that were available at the time.

Categories
Blogs and blogging Events and Life Travel and places

Tweeting to preserve history

I suppose Twitter still has its good use cases. Tweeting to preserve history isn’t one of them. I came across this fascinating Twitter thread by Marina Amaral about the Sami people, who’ve been living in what’s now Finland for thousands of years:

The thread runs for several tweets, and it includes wonderful resources such as maps, old photos, and more recent photos that illustrate how these people have adapted to a modern world.

As much as I enjoyed reading Marina’s wonderful overview of these people’s history, I couldn’t help but wonder why she chose to tweet this, instead of blogging it? She has a remarkable blog that covers a range of historical events, and themes.

When it comes to digital preservation of these sorts of cultural and historical legacies, surely publishing it to a blog would be a far better medium?

Photo credit: D Sami Reindeer 12 by Michiel van Nimwegen, licensed CC BY NC ND 2.0

Categories
Design Devices Miscellany Photography

Colourful computer history

I love James Ball’s colourful photographic history of computers.

These machines are grossly under-powered compared to the devices we use today. Still, they’re a wonderful reminder of how far we’ve come, and what lies ahead for us in technological terms. This Telefunken RA770 (circa 1970) is one of my favourites:

Via The Stylish & Colorful Computing Machines of Yesteryear by Jason Kottke

Categories
Events and Life Science and nature

How Humans first walked on the Moon in Apollo 11

Vox has a terrific video that explains how the Apollo 11 mission worked, and how the astronauts that took part in the mission made their way to the Moon and back.

If you’re into old footage of historical events like this, also be sure to check out the CBS coverage of the lunar landing (also courtesy of NASA):

Categories
Blogs and blogging Miscellany

My blog-Twitter stats synchronicity

I just noticed that there is a little synchronicity between my blog stats and my Twitter stats. 4,022 blog posts alongside 40.2k tweets … See? 😁

Blog stats
4,022 blog posts already … boy, where did the time go?

My Twitter stats
40,2k tweets and more than a decade on Twitter. Where did that time go?

I doubt very much that there are any stars and/or planets in alignment for this one. Just the same, it’s a fun little thing for me.

Categories
Photography Travel and places

Organ music and roller skating at the Moonlight Rollerway

Dominic, the owner of Moonlight Rollerway, playing organ music
“Dominic, the owner of Moonlight Rollerway, plays the organ there every Tuesday night.” – Lisa Whiteman

I love stories like this one about the Moonlight Rollerway by Lisa Whiteman. Mostly I enjoy the photographs of what seems to be to be fragments of Americana/American nostalgia that speak to a very different time.

Every Tuesday night, Lillian Tomasino laces up her roller skates, puts her arms around her partner, and glides in sweeping circles across the floor of Moonlight Rollerway. Holding each other like ballroom dancers, she and Tom Clayton move effortlessly to the jaunty, classic tunes played live on a Hammond organ above the Glendale, California, rink.

Via “Throwback: LA roller rink still has a weekly organ night” on Kottke.org (one of my favourite blogs).

Categories
Mobile Tech Photography

The camera phone was invented to share a newborn baby photo in 1997

We take for granted that we can take photos with our phones and share them instantly. We don’t really think about it and that this capability is only 20 years old.

Did you know that Philippe Kahn is credited with inventing the first camera-phone and he did it to capture the birth of his daughter? Here is his story:

This is the first photo taken with Kahn’s prototype camera phone:

Philippe Kahn's first camera phone photo, taken in 1997
Philippe Kahn’s first camera phone photo, taken in 1997

As incredible as his creation was at the time, I am even more impressed with his wife. There she was, pregnant and about to give birth, and she encouraged him to build the critical connection he needed to connect his camera to his phone and laptop.

Image credit: Alice Donovan Rouse