Screenshots from my browser console? Oh Firefox, you spoil me!

This is awesome, particularly the ability to screenshot specific elements using element-specific flags:

Firefox DevTools has now added a screenshot command, so you can take screenshots directly from the Console

Oh Firefox, You Little Resource Hog

I love using Firefox as my primary browser. I prefer using it for a variety of reasons. Lately, though, I’ve noticed that it’s become a bit of a resource hog, and I can’t work out why? I’ve disabled add-ons that I don’t need, and it still uses about 1.4GB of RAM at a minimum for pages that Chrome uses a quarter of RAM for.

Has something changed in Firefox’s architecture? One thought I had is that maybe this has to do with something like page pre-fetching (I think Firefox does that), or something along those lines. I want to sort this out. Chrome seems to be so much better at resource management at the moment.

Update (2018-03-18): Mozilla shared this page to help troubleshoot Firefox memory issues: Firefox uses too much memory (RAM) – How to fix | Firefox Help

Photo by ideadad on Unsplash

A little Firefox nostalgia

The Firefox 3 robot
The Firefox 3 robot declares victory. Design apparently by Nobox.

I’ve started using Firefox a lot more lately. The browser feels like a new beast lately, especially Firefox Nightly which I started using because of the CSS Grid Inspector tool.

Firefox 55 was released on the stable channel yesterday and it is also pretty snappy. Chrome is starting to feel a little sluggish by comparison (although it’s possible that I’m imagining it).

I found myself thinking back to the marketing campaign for Firefox 3 back in 2008 (I think). At the time, Firefox wasn’t on its current 6-8 week release cycle so developments took a bit longer.

For some reason, Firefox 3 was a big deal back then. I don’t remember why but I do have a vivid memory of the robot imagery that Mozilla used to publicise the release. I found this image on Flickr earlier this afternoon.

Almost a decade later, there is still something about this robot imagery that I love.

Firefox making moves on Chrome

If you’re curious about this “new” Firefox that people are talking about lately, you may find this article interesting:

It’s tempting to just dismiss this browser as a “has been” and stick with Chrome. Chrome is a great browser and dominates the Web. Still, I think having a spunky challenger with a strong focus on an inclusive and open Web is important.

Just as it successfully challenged Internet Explorer back in the day, Firefox could help keep Chrome in check where it counts.

One of the weirdest Firefox unboxing videos ever!

When it comes to unboxing videos, this Firefox unboxing video is the weirdest I’ve ever seen!

I have Firefox set as my default browser on my work laptop, primarily for performance reasons: Chrome is just too heavy for my somewhat underpowered Lenovo laptop, even running Ubuntu Linux.

The web was built by hand

I’ve been a Firefox fan since Firefox was in pre-1.0 beta. Even though it isn’t my primary browser at the moment (wait 5 minutes, my defaults can change without notice), I still love what it stands for and the work the Mozilla Foundation is doing. This video nicely encapsulates that mission:

I love this idea that the web was built by hand (which, if you think about it, it was). Firefox may not be the hot browser right now but it is largely the reason why we have a more open web today.


Photo credit: Lego Firefox by Johnathan Nightingale, licensed CC BY-SA 2.0

Removing the annoying blinking cursor in Firefox

One of the reasons I stopped using Firefox as my primary browser was something pretty small, but annoying: a seemingly random cursor on the screen. I couldn’t work out how to stop it from appearing when I clicked on the screen until I found this forum post titled “Firefox shows a blinking “edit” cursor in the body of all websites when I click” –

Clicking a button within a webpage puts a blinking text cursor in the body of the site, as if editing a Word document. It’s not causing any other problems besides being really annoying and distracting, but it only just started today. I’ve tried restarting Firefox with add-ons disabled, as well as reinstalling Firefox clean.

Fortunately the solution turns out to be pretty simple:

This is likely caused by switching on caret browsing and you can toggle caret browsing on/off by pressing F7 (Mac: fn + F7).

The Firefox DRM implementation – a glimmer of light

Mozilla’s decision to implement DRM code is disappointing and Cory Doctorow’s article titled “Firefox’s adoption of closed-source DRM breaks my heart” is worth reading for his perspectives. I noticed one positive aspect of the Firefox implementation, though –

There are other ways in which Mozilla’s DRM is better for user freedom than its commercial competitors’. While the commercial browsers’ DRM assigns unique identifiers to users that can be used to spy on viewing habits across multiple video providers and sessions, the Mozilla DRM uses different identifiers for different services. And unlike the commercial browsers’ DRM, the Mozilla implementation does not intentionally leak any information about the user’s system or its configuration to video services.

Firefox 29 is a good looking browser

Update (2014-04-30): I tried it out for a bit and then encountered two things that bugged me enough to switch back to Chrome:

  1. A blinking cursor on a random space on a page that I have seen in previous versions and irritates me;
  2. The Evernote extension is about 2 generations behind the current Chrome and Safari versions.


Mozilla released its latest version of the Firefox browser today. Version 29 boasts the new Australis design and it is a good looking browser! I only just started playing with it and might default to it for a bit (I like new shiny things).

Before:

Firefox 28 - not too shabby looking
]2 Firefox 28 – not too shabby looking

After:

Firefox 29 - a pretty good looking browser.
]3 Firefox 29 – a pretty good looking browser.

Here is an intro video if that tickles you too: