Categories
Applications Devices Mobile Tech

Remove Facebook from your phone at your peril

I recently decided to remove Facebook from my phone. I made the decision after finding myself opening the app and frequently being pretty underwhelmed by the updates Facebook insisted on notifying me about.

Although I was tempted to delete the app altogether, I decided to remove the app from my home screen instead. This means I’d need to find it in my app drawer to open it.

The immediate benefit was that I didn’t find myself opening the app because I was bored and then wondered why I bothered. The downside had been that the main utility Facebook has for me has been buried: I’ve started missing birthdays!

Yup, probably the most valuable part of Facebook to me is the birthday calendar and not checking the app obsessively means I have started missing birthdays. I can’t seem to work out how to sync birthday calendars with my phone yet (I think I know how to do it) so I’ve been reliant on the app to remind me.

Aside from that, my decision to remove Facebook from my phone has been worthwhile so far. I don’t open the app out of mindless habit. I don’t have that regret when I do and I have replaced Facebook’s spot on my home screen with Feedly instead.

Much better use of that attention-grabbing spot.

If you’ve been dissatisfied with your Facebook experience lately and you’re tempted to remove it from your mobile device, just consider the loss of the features like the birthday calendar and decide if it’s worth it.

Categories
Publishing

” … chasing dollars and attention at any cost …”

Photo of Om Malik
Om Malik

If anything, the turmoil of the last few months has highlighted the role the media has played in many of the challenges facing us in its pursuit of attention. Om Malik expresses the central issue well in his post titled “Two relevant thoughts about media”:

What I find ironic is that the a thinker in the 1950s and a pop-star in 1990 got everything so right, while media industry keeps coming up with explanations that increasingly sound hollow. Media (as an industry and as cultural barometer) has often tried to shift blame to others — cable, Internet, Facebook, Google, Fake News — but seldom takes into account its own role in accelerating the breakdown of social norms and values. It is chasing dollars and attention at any cost which has lead to where we are.

Read Malik’s post on his blog:

Two relevant thoughts about media

Photo credit: Om Malik by Christopher Michel, licensed CC BY-NC 2.0

Categories
Events and Life Travel and places

“We see our soulmate as in the way” – Subway Love

I love this video titled “Subway Love” by Max Stossel about misplaced attention and the missed opportunities that pass us by each day because we’re focused on the wrong things.

How often do we miss an opportunity for a human connection because we are fixated on an arriving train or a screen?

I’m pretty sure I do it all the time. It’s almost as if we have forgotten how to be human and connect to people in meaningful ways.

Image credit: Pixabay

Categories
Events and Life Mindsets

A couple thoughts about mindfulness

Quick Bensusan Photographic Museum tour-16

Mindfulness is the best thing you can do for yourself. That practice of just being mindful of what you do, why you do it and reaching down into who you are will also radically change your life. It takes a lot of time and persistence and it really pays off. Be mindful of the things that you resist as well as the things that attract you because both reveal important personal truths and will guide you towards a more meaningful and fulfilling life.

Also, don’t be too hard on yourself. Expect more of yourself and strive to do better, be better, but beating yourself up takes you further away from where you want to be.