Silence is not necessarily golden for Evernote

I’ve been an Evernote user for well over a decade, and I used it daily until a couple years ago. I have almost 29,000 notes (a fair number of these notes are automatically captured using IFTTT workflows).

In recent years, Evernote has been pretty quiet on its blog, and while it’s released updates to the app, I haven’t felt like this is a dynamic company, constantly working to evolve it’s product. This has been a little disconcerting, as I have a lot of data in Evernote that I have been storing there intentionally.

At the moment, there isn’t another service like Evernote that uses this notes and notebook model to capture different content types into a pretty flexible reference system. I use Google Drive to store a lot of my stuff too, but it doesn’t feel as fluid to me.

I’ve also been experimenting with a private WordPress.com site too. I think this option is pretty close to Evernote, and even has some benefits that Evernote lacks because WordPress uses web technology (it is a publishing platform after all), so it opens the door to much richer content embeds, and formatting.

Still, short of an importer from Evernote to WordPress, or another suitable alternative, I’ve stuck with Evernote. It’s the simplest solution, even if Evernote becomes a historical reference service for me.

That being said, it was encouraging to see this video from Evernote’s current CEO about how they’ll be giving us insights into what’s happening behind the scenes, and what they’re working on:

I don’t know what lies ahead for Evernote. My Premium subscription is up for renewal next month, and I’m pretty sure I’ll renew, at least for another year. For now, though, I’m looking forward to see what they have in the pipeline. It might just tempt me back into more regular use.

Bookmark the Gutenberg Plugin Review

One of my colleagues, Álvaro, runs the site Gutenberg Plugin Review that’s worth bookmarking, and following, if you’re interested in the growing category of Gutenberg plugins.

Update (2019-05-22): Gutenberg Times recently published a post covering almost 100 plugins for the block editor that you may find really helpful too:

This is quite a list!

unsplash-logoFeatured image by Tim Easley

Whale bones and shadows

We have a curious structure in one of our city parks that’s a little controversial. Some people really don’t like it, most aren’t sure what it’s supposed to represent. It appeals to me, although I can’t quite work out how to photograph it.

I took advantage of a couple evening walks past the park to take a few photos with my phone. Ideally, I’d like to head there one night with my DSLR and my tripod, and try out a few angles and exposures.

I particularly like the shadows at night. Definitely worth exploring when I have some time on one evening.

Chalk worth hoarding

I enjoyed this story about how mathematicians have been hoarding Hagoromo chalk because it’s apparently such amazing chalk. I remember boxes of cheap chalk from my school years. Clearly this chalk is in a different league altogether.

unsplash-logoFeatured image by Daniel Watson

Jewish pride at the new Yitzhak Navon train station in Jerusalem

I took the new(ish) fast train to Jerusalem with my friend today. It was my first time on that train, and I really enjoyed the new Yitzhak Navon station.

We arrived mid-morning, and was greeted by this Star of David Shadow caused by lines of Israeli flags in the open air atrium of the station:

Southern Israel is under attack at the moment. This is what it looks like.

Southern Israel is under attack, again. Hamas and its allies have been firing hundreds of rockets at Israeli towns and cities for the last day or so. Imagine that you were in this situation:

Image credit: Israel Defense Forces, licensed CC BY-NC 2.0

Ambling around Lisbon

We had a free day today, as our team meetup winds down. I went for a casual walk around part of Lisbon that we hadn’t seen yet with two colleagues today.

Usually, when I walk, I walk. This time, we literally ambled along in the general direction of the coast. We didn’t actually reach the coast, but we did see more of this really pretty city.

We found ourselves outside the Jardim da Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian (map) just after passing the Spanish Embassy, so we went in. The gardens are more like a jungle, with paths leading through the trees and bushes.

The garden seems to be designed in such a way that you suddenly emerge into an open space containing a sort of public performance area, or the Museu Calouste Gulbenkian art museum.

I enjoyed the diversion through the park. When you’re walking through it, you’re shielded from road noise, so you mostly hear trees, water in the streams and fountains, and other visitors.

It was a really nice day to be outdoors today, and we enjoyed a stroll back to our hotel before lunch.

My Lisbon experience

I’m in Lisbon for my team’s meetup (last year we were in Rome). Our first day was a free day, and we went on a walking tour of parts of Lisbon. It was a terrific introduction to this city. Of course, I made plenty of photos.

We took the Metro to where we were going to meet our tour guide. I really like Lisbon’s subway stations. They each have a distinctive design, most of which appeal to me.

Rossio Square

We started off in Rossio Square where we met our tour guide, and started our walk.

Lisbon Massacre Memorial

Our first stop from there was a church that was a focal point of a tragedy for the Lisbon Jewish community, the Lisbon Massacre.

From there, we made our way back past Rossio Square deeper into the city.

Carmo Convent

We made our way up a hill (Lisbon is pretty hilly) to the Carmo Convent, which is also near an archaeological museum. There was a public gathering ahead of the Portuguese Freedom Day (also known as the Carnation Revolution). According to Culture Trip:

The words “military coup” and “peaceful” don’t usually go hand in hand, but they do when describing Portugal’s Carnation Revolution. Every year on April 25, Portugal remembers the non-violent rebellion that ended a 50-year long dictatorship and reestablished democracy in the country. Also known as Freedom Day, April 25 has become a national holiday that is celebrated across the country and in particular, in Lisbon.

How the Portuguese Celebrate April 25th, the Carnation Revolution