Where is Microsoft’s thrill gone?

Jeremy Wright has weighed in on how Microsoft seems to have lost its appeal as a possible employer.  Scoble has commented on the need to thrill customers:

But, now the technology industry needs to focus extra hard on thrilling
customers. Microsoft has a lot of work to do before it does that. That was
Lenn’s final challenge as he walked out the door. Thrill customers or else
they’ll go elsewhere. And quickly.

It is, at least for Jeremy, all about working where both the company and the work is exciting and that fuels your passion for what you do.  He shares Scoble’s call for more of a thrill and the lack thereof takes centre stage for him when considering possible employment options.

I’ve been really struggling with my opinions of Microsoft in the last few months. Less than a year ago, Microsoft was my dream job. Being an evangelist on the windows / IE / XBox / Office / MSN / etc teams would have floored me. Being a PM would have rocked as well. It would have rocked hard.

I started noticing the change early this year. I was offered several interviews, and turned them all down. At the time it was because I was already doing my “dream job?? (this blogging thing) and didn’t want to give that up. Which was, and still is, true. But at the same time there was something deeper: a sense that maybe Microsoft wasn’t where I wanted to work anymore.

I like his approach to finding that ‘dream job’.  I share his views.  I have considered finding a similar job with another firm and I keep coming back to the fact that a similar job elsewhere probably wouldn’t cut it.  Jeremy says it well:

My challenge is that I don’t just want “any job?? (if I ever do take a job
again). I want a job, working on a product or service, within a team as part of
a company which will thrill me. A year ago, that would have been
Microsoft.

Interestingly enough, I have thought about looking for a job at Microsoft based on what I have heard about Microsoft as an employer, not that I know what I could do there.  Perhaps not.

By the way, has anyone noticed that Jeremy’s blog looks better in IE than in Firefox whereas Scoble’s blog looks better in Firefox than in IE?  Interesting!

Paul

Enthusiast, writer, strategist, web developer, and photographer. Passionate about my wife, Gina and #proudDad.

  1. > By the way, has anyone noticed that Jeremy’s blog looks better in IE than in Firefox

    Ooh, pick me, pick me! 😉

    I’m hoping to put together a redesign in the next few months which’ll not only solve this problem (when this version was designed, 97% of my readers were on IE, now it’s less than 50%), but will also be much more lightweight (graphically and so forth).

  2. > By the way, has anyone noticed that Jeremy's blog looks better in IE than in Firefox

    Ooh, pick me, pick me! 😉

    I'm hoping to put together a redesign in the next few months which'll not only solve this problem (when this version was designed, 97% of my readers were on IE, now it's less than 50%), but will also be much more lightweight (graphically and so forth).

  3. > By the way, has anyone noticed that Jeremy’s blog looks better in IE than in Firefox

    Ooh, pick me, pick me! 😉

    I’m hoping to put together a redesign in the next few months which’ll not only solve this problem (when this version was designed, 97% of my readers were on IE, now it’s less than 50%), but will also be much more lightweight (graphically and so forth).

  4. > By the way, has anyone noticed that Jeremy’s blog looks better in IE than in Firefox

    Ooh, pick me, pick me! 😉

    I’m hoping to put together a redesign in the next few months which’ll not only solve this problem (when this version was designed, 97% of my readers were on IE, now it’s less than 50%), but will also be much more lightweight (graphically and so forth).

What do you think?

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