New Holocaust museum opened in Jerusalem

BBC NEWS has reported on the opening of a new museum in Jerusalem that commemorates the Holocaust in a very special way:

The new museum focuses on the individual tragedies of the Holocaust,
with collections of personal stories woven into the displays.


 

A video projected on a wall at the entrance shows daily Jewish life in
Europe in the 1920s and 30s, while visitors can see victims’ personal
artefacts, including braids of hair cut by a mother from her
11-year-old daughter, before the girl was deported from Germany to her
death.


     
 
   
      
"We gave the victims an identity. We gave them a voice. We gave them a face," said curator Yehudit Inbar.

     
 
   
      

 

Have a look at the Yad Vashem site for an overview of the museum.  The focus on individuals takes the focus away from the huge and nebulous numbers that often find their way into any discussion of the Holocaust and shifts it to the individuals whose lives were irrevocably changed or ended by this tragedy.

Paul
Enthusiast, marketing strategist, writer, and photographer. Passionate about my wife, Gina and #proudDad. Allergic to stupid

  1. I think it is really important – beside knowing the general facts and numbers of the holocaust – to try to give the victims their personalities somehow back by remembering them in their very own, personal way of life before the murdering was due to begin. For me as a german it was one of the most intrinsic and moving experience of my life being at Auschwitz, seeing these numerous collected glasses, imagining that behind every single pair of glasses there has been a pair of living eyes, now vanished for ever, for no reason at all. A deeply horrifying but nessecary experience.

  2. I think it is really important – beside knowing the general facts and numbers of the holocaust – to try to give the victims their personalities somehow back by remembering them in their very own, personal way of life before the murdering was due to begin. For me as a german it was one of the most intrinsic and moving experience of my life being at Auschwitz, seeing these numerous collected glasses, imagining that behind every single pair of glasses there has been a pair of living eyes, now vanished for ever, for no reason at all. A deeply horrifying but nessecary experience.

  3. I think it is really important – beside knowing the general facts and numbers of the holocaust – to try to give the victims their personalities somehow back by remembering them in their very own, personal way of life before the murdering was due to begin. For me as a german it was one of the most intrinsic and moving experience of my life being at Auschwitz, seeing these numerous collected glasses, imagining that behind every single pair of glasses there has been a pair of living eyes, now vanished for ever, for no reason at all. A deeply horrifying but nessecary experience.

  4. I think it is really important – beside knowing the general facts and numbers of the holocaust – to try to give the victims their personalities somehow back by remembering them in their very own, personal way of life before the murdering was due to begin. For me as a german it was one of the most intrinsic and moving experience of my life being at Auschwitz, seeing these numerous collected glasses, imagining that behind every single pair of glasses there has been a pair of living eyes, now vanished for ever, for no reason at all. A deeply horrifying but nessecary experience.

What do you think?

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